Pairing the New England Clambake

As a lifetime New Englander, I basically grew up on everything you’d find at a traditional clam bake: a variety of steamed quahogs and littlenecks, mussels, boiled lobster, crab legs, corn on the cob drenched in melted butter, boiled red potatoes, clam chowder, potato, macaroni, and green salads… the list goes on and on. To me, this is the epitome of summertime dining in New England. Little did I know as a child, this culinary tradition would only get better once I was an adult and had a knowledge of wine to add even more enjoyment.

Let’s Talk Wine Pairing

Clams (quahogs, littlenecks, cherrystones) and mussels are absolutely delicious steamed and dipped in melted butter. Often times I’ll grab an oaked, buttery Chardonnay (such as DeLoach Private Collection Chalk Hill) for that melt-in-your-mouth experience, or I’ll grab a zesty and lively Sauvignon Blanc (such as Riversong Sauvignon Blanc), with a bit more crispness and acidity than a Chard. It’s really a matter of my particular mood and preference that day, but either one provides a home run pairing that is sure to please.

I recently posted an entire blog for Lobster Day, highlighting various lobster dishes and my favorite varietals. There are so many delicious choices for perfect pairing, although my absolute favorite is a dry sparkling wine, particularly Cremant de Loire (such as Abbesse Cremant de Loire), which provides the perfect note of salinity to compliment shellfish.

King crab legs are one of my faves, although a bit interactive. When I don’t mind getting my hands dirty and working for my food, I grab my nut and seafood cracker and get to crackin’ those spiny bad boys. Next to my plate of crab legs and pool of melted butter is a perfectly chilled glass of dry Riesling from Alsace, France, or a fruit forward, fuller bodied Pinot Gris (such as Hillersden Pinot Gris from Marlborough, New Zealand).

Clam chowder all year long… comfort food in the winter, beachy goodness in the summer. My suggested wine pairing is equally as versatile. Two of my favorites, Bees Knees Chenin Blanc/Viognier and Lobster Shack Chardonnay/Viognier, both from South Africa offer a beautiful balance of refreshing fruit and lively acidity with a weightier mouthfeel appropriate for both summertime and wintertime dining.

The Sides

Corn-on-the-cob, boiled potatoes, salads of all sorts. Every wine mentioned above would pair beautifully with all of these sides. Have fun with the experimenting! No clam bake would be complete without a rosé , and I am absolutely digging Paris Street Rose from Romania. A few more notable suggested wines would include The Arch Pinot Noir, for all you die hard red wine lovers, and Sonnenstrahl Grüner Veltliner from Austria. Happy pairing!

Join Our Clambake and Wine Pairing

None of the work, all of the fun! Enjoy the cuisine of Chef J. Rex poolside at Lantera Boston Landing on Wednesday, July 31st at 6:30pm as I guide you through the perfect wine pairings with each course!
Click here for tickets and more information or find our event on Facebook

Cheers!
Missa
winedowntastings.com

National Cheese Day

June 4th is National Cheese Day! Cheese boards are a staple of my home entertaining. There is nothing simpler, yet delicious and enthusiastically received by my guests than a variety of cheeses to pair with whichever wines we will be sipping on. Cheese boards can be inexpensive with easy to find, traditional cheeses most Americans are familiar with, or they can be an eclectic spread of costly gourmet cheeses from all over the world. I often enjoy having one or two gourmet cheeses that are new or unique to my crowd of guests, accompanied by several common “ol’ standby” cheeses to offer a little something for everyone. In honor of National Cheese Day, I offer you seven simple, easy to find cheeses and my favorite varietals to pair with them perfectly.

  • Herbed goat cheese with Sauvignon Blanc
  • Delice de Bourgogne with Chardonnay
  • Gruyere with Gewurztraminer
  • Feta or Gorgonzola with dry rosé
  • Buffalo mozzarella with Sangiovese
  • Smoked Gouda with Syrah/Shriaz
  • Horseradish cheddar with Cabernet Sauvignon

Want to learn more? Join us at one of our VINOIsLife public wine and cheese pairing experiences in the greater Boston/MetroWest areas! Click here for our experience schedule.

Cheers!
Missa
winedowntastings.com

Wine and Chocolate For Valentine’s Day

Originally published in South Shore Senior News, February 2019 Edition

Wine and chocolate, a match made in heaven in this wine lover’s opinion. I tell my students, when in doubt, grab a bag of dark chocolate and a bottle of tannic red wine, and you will have an evening of deliciously paired bliss. There is so much to explore in the world of chocolate and wine. Valentine’s Day is upon us, and what better time than to take our taste buds on a sweet adventure?

White chocolate and Pinot Noir is probably the most surprising and delicious chocolate and wine pairing I’ve ever experienced. Pour yourself a glass of Pinot Noir, then put a square of quality white chocolate on your tongue and savor. While the chocolate is melting, raise the glass to your nose and breathe in the aromas of the wine. You will start to taste an incredible vanilla flavor that wasn’t noticeable before. Once you’ve enjoyed this sensation, take a sip of the wine, coating the white chocolate as it continues to melt, and enjoy pure bliss.

Old vine Zinfandels are some of my favorite wines, and I’m absolutely obsessed with pairing them with dark chocolate raspberry, such as Ghirardelli dark chocolate raspberry squares. Zinfandels are so jammy and fruit forward that these chocolate squares will turn that wine into liquid raspberry on the palate in the most heavenly of ways.

Cabernet Sauvignon tends to have undertones of eucalyptus or mint, which makes these hefty reds the ideal partner for chocolate mint. You can go beyond dark chocolate mint candies and pair them with Mint Milanos, Thin Mint cookies, or even grasshoppers.

I enjoy the flavor of coffee in pretty much anything, and chocolate is no exception. You will bring out a delicious earthy, mocha note when pairing red wine with dark chocolate covered espresso or coffee beans. Earthier varietals like Cabernet Franc and Pinotage will truly impress with this delightful pairing.

A fun and unusual combination I have grown to love is dark chocolate chili, which provides a nice spicy kick. Enjoy this with a nice Syrah/Shiraz, and watch the fruit and spice dance happily on the palate, switching off who takes the lead.

What about white wines? These can be a bit tricky, especially the drier ones, as too much sugar will amplify the acid, resulting in an unpleasant bitter taste. I have found the heavier bodied oakier whites, such as Chardonnay, pair wonderfully with creamy white chocolate, or even milk chocolate covered nuts or turtles. Try an off-dry white, such as a Riesling, or a sweeter white, such as a Moscato, with milk chocolate caramels with sea salt.

Want to explore a little outside the box? Try chocolate covered bacon for a new and exciting twist. This gives you the best of the wine pairing world: salt and fat blanketed in decadent chocolate. You could even drizzle chocolate on some salty kettle chips for a similar effect.

When it comes to wine and chocolate pairing, the best part is the “research”! 

Cheers!
Missa
winedowntastings.com

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The Wine Lab – North Andover, MA

Scrolling through Facebook one day, I saw that a new wine bar had opened up in North Andover, which is about an hour north of me and a town I drive through all the time when I commute to work at the Traveling Vineyard corporate office. It looked like a pretty cool concept… an urban style winery that sources grapes from various places, then vinifies and bottles under their own name, The Wine Lab. I was really excited to check it out, so one beautiful fall afternoon this past weekend I took a ride up to North Andover, met up with a great friend, and got to see what The Wine Lab is all about.

The Wine Lab is located in a beautiful historic mill building that appears to be a thriving spot for local businesses. It’s a gorgeous rustic-meets-modern space with high ceilings and a large bar in the center, surrounded by many high top tables, and a cozy living room-like space with leather chairs and coffee tables. Immediately upon entering, I knew this was a place I could see myself spending many an evening with great friends.

But What About The Wine?

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I decided to order one of the wine flights on the menu called the Devil Flight. This flight consisted of three reds, then your choice of whichever wine you wanted for the fourth. I chose the Chardonnay as my fourth wine, and the three reds that came in the flight were a Pinot Noir, a Cabernet Sauvignon, and a Malbec. They arrived in little test tubes, a quirky and fun way to present a flight in a place that calls itself a lab, accompanied by a large empty glass for tasting. Love the creative presentation!

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They served them in what I thought was a strange order to serve wine in: Cab Sauv, Pinot Noir, Malbec, then Chardonnay. Naturally, I tasted them in what I believe to be a more proper order and began with the Chardonnay.

Summer Day Chardonnay was a nice basic Chardonnay. No signs of significant oak, a medium weight with good acidity. The grapes are sourced from California, and the winemaking didn’t seem to be anything special. A decent, crisp white wine that would pair lovely with a variety of foods and satisfy most white wine drinkers.

I then poured the Red Dragon Pinot Noir into my glass. These grapes are sourced from Lodi, CA and displayed a bright ruby red in the glass. The texture was super smooth with very light tannins, and this wine showed a bit of tart fruit, including cranberry, pomegranate, dried strawberry, and red raspberry. It was a bit more floral than I would expect from a Pinot Noir, and more fruity than earthy or rustic. It was a nice easy drinker that would pair with a variety of lighter foods.

Next, I tried the She Drank It All Cabernet Sauvignon, also sourced from Lodi, CA. The color was almost identical to the Pinot Noir, which I found peculiar, but the flavor and texture was even more odd. Dare I say, this Cab was even lighter in flavor and body than the Pinot Noir. I’m not sure how that can even happen, especially grown in an AVA such as Lodi where you would expect much more deep fruit and heavier tannins. This wine was incredibly floral, something else I wouldn’t expect from a Cab. This showed extremely light fruit, very light tannin, little to no oak, and notes of red plum. Missing was any herbal or eucalyptus notes I’d expect from a Cab, and certainly no deep, dark fruits. It was interesting, to say the least.

Finally, I tried the Smooth Criminal Malbec, also sourced from Lodi, CA. This was my favorite of the flight. The most tannic and structured of the reds, it was still quite smooth and soft. This had deeper fruit, although still more red fruit notes than black fruit, and almost had a bubble gum character to it you’d find in a wine that has undergone carbonic or semi-carbonic maceration.

Light Bites

We decided to split a couple of light bites, so we ordered the Antipasto Skewers and the Deconstructed Beets and Buratta. These plates were fantastic! I ordered a glass of Smooth Criminal Malbec to sip on while we snacked, and it was a perfect compliment to both appetizers.

The Wine Lab is a fabulous place to visit, and I hope it thrives for years to come. The atmosphere is welcoming and spacious, the service is top notch, and the food is incredible. I personally found the wine to be average, but certainly enjoyable. I will most definitely return in the future to enjoy more Malbec and experience more options on their menu.

Tour de France – French Wine Review

Within this past year, I became a Certified French Wine Scholar with the Wine Scholar Guild. I have always had an enormous appreciation for French viticulture and viniculture, so being able to immerse myself in studying these topics intensely was a dream come true. As much love as I had prior to my certification course, my passion for French wine has increased exponentially, and it was a thrilling ride to be able to curate and review the French wine selections for Boston Wine School‘s September 2018 Flash Sale. This tour of France is a wonderful and exciting way to understand and taste terroir in your glass, seeing the differences and nuances of various popular French wine regions, and even the differences between sub-regions!

Each of these wines are what I consider to be “food wines”. The French have mastered the art of food and wine pairing for daily enjoyment. I urge you to decant your bottle of choice and let it breathe while you prepare a delicious meal, or perhaps even a charcuterie board of meat, cheeses, nuts, olives, and dark chocolate. By the end of your food preparation, your wine should be ready to be thoroughly enjoyed as a condiment to your food of choice. Cheers!
01Benedictus02RochMillon03LePreduMoine04ChateauColombe05ChateauLaLoubiere06LeGrandChaiMedoc07JeanPierreMoueix08VieuxChateauGibeau09LeGrandChaiMontagne10DomaineMartinRasteau11LePrincedeCourthezon12GrandeReservedeGassacRouge

A Tale of Two Sauvignon Blancs

Traveling Vineyard has released two long awaited Sauvignon Blancs! I immediately ordered a bottle of each so I could “test them out” (haha, tough job) and see first hand what the differences are. Tasting them both together was a great way to see the differences, because I honestly don’t know if the differences are SO noticeable that one could tell them apart without the side-by-side.

jitterbugluloframeOur 2014 Lulo Sauvignon Blanc is from Dry Creek Valley, California and sourced from the Dry Creek Vineyard estate, which was the first new winery in the Dry Creek Valley appellation after prohibition. It also contains fruit from the Clarksburg appellation. Lulo is 99% Sauvignon Blanc and 1% Semillon, which gives it a little Bordeaux style roundness. It was aged in temperature controlled stainless steel with no oak.

Our 2014 Jitterbug Sauvignon Blanc is from mostly Clarksburg, California, with some fruit sourced from Dry Creek Valley and the Russian River Valley. It is 100% Sauvignon Blanc aged in temperature controlled stainless steel only.

Right off the bat, they are both crisp, clean, light and refreshing with plenty of fruit. The acidity is very well balanced and doesn’t give that piercing, mouthwatering feeling on the tongue, which I think will appeal to a wide audience really well. The main difference between these two very similar wines: Lulo is definitely a bit smoother and has a nice rounded out finish. Jitterbug is a bit more citrusy, as far as the “feel” of citrus on the tongue. It was a bit sharper, for lack of better terms, but just slightly.

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Pairing: I paired them both with the same pairings. Macadamia nuts smoothed them both right out, as this nut will do with any acidic white.

Next up: meat rolls. We had rolls of ham, roast beef, turkey, and provolone all rolled up as one. This was fantastic with both wines, so a chef’s salad would be great with these wines, deli platters, ham and cheese sandwiches, Italian subs, muffalettas, etc. would be a delight. A great cold cut wine! I found Jitterbug brought out more of the meat flavors, and Lulo expressed more citrus fruit with this pairing. So interesting to note: Jitterbug brought out the food flavors where the meat rolls brought out the fruit flavors in Lulo. Opposite effect!

Next up: spinach dip with Stacey’s pita chips. This was phenomenal with both wines, but interestingly once again brought out two different aspects of each wine. Jitterbug made the spinach flavor itself stand out, while Lulo seemed to express a more herbal quality. Just like with the meat rolls, Jitterbug complimented the food and brought out the food flavors, while the food brought out the flavors in Lulo.

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Finally dinner: tossed some marinated chicken on the grill and grilled up some fresh pineapple rings. WOW! The chicken, grilled pineapple, and wine in the mouth at the same time was a fruit explosion! I can’t say which one I liked better, because they were both amazing with this pairing.

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We also boiled jumbo shrimp in Mojo seasoning. The shrimp/grilled pineapple/wine combo was just as good, because the Mojo seasoning has just a little kick of spice and citrus to it. We made a green salad and topped it with freshly grated lemongrass and then dressed with with olive oil and lemon juice. Simply fantastic!

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So my opinion? They are both incredible wines, especially for the summer weather and summer fare! If I had to choose one, which would I choose? Depends on the situation. Jitterbug has an amazing capacity for bringing out the flavors of its food pairings, so if I’m all about showcasing the food, I might go for Jitterbug. Lulo, on the other hand, is so smooth and has incredibly refreshing fruits coming forward when paired with food, so if I’m all about showcasing the wine, then I might go for Lulo. Either make a fantastic sipping wine. You’ll note I used a lot of lemon and citrus in these dishes… that was no mistake. These are two very acidic wines, and lemon will smooth out that acidity. I also wanted to bring the fruit notes forwards, which is why I used fresh lemongrass and grilled pineapple.

My customers already LOVE these wines, and the pairings are simple. Anything acidic and citrusy, anything acidic like goat cheese and various dairy based dips and spreads, cold cuts and sandwiches, salads, and certainly anything with some spice to it. This will be a fantastic sushi pairing wine

I brought Lulo to one of my in-home wine tastings last weekend, and we paired it with three-cheese artichoke dip and bbq chicken. It was a HUGE hit!

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I have never been a huge Sauvignon Blanc fan, but Lulo and Jitterbug have completely changed that! These are now two of my absolute favorites! Interested in trying them for yourself! You can have them delivered right to your door! Order at www.winedowntastings.com

Cheers!
Missa
facebook.com/winedowntastings

Napa Valley Masterclass with the Guild of Sommeliers

Hello wine lovers! I’ve been busy sharing my love of wine with others and learning as much as I can by going to classes and wine seminars-a-plenty!

On April 15, 2015 I attended a Masterclass with the Guild of Sommeliers at Catalyst in Cambridge, MA. Matt Stamp, MS was the instructor, who is the Education Director for Guild of Sommeliers. Living in Napa Valley himself, Matt Stamp has a wealth of knowledge to share and I was really glad I took this class! It started at 10am and was going to involve tasting 18 wines in 4 flights in 3 hours. Oh my!

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First, a whole lot of education about Napa. Napa Valley is known for its incredible Cabernet Sauvignons, which typically aren’t very cheap. The price tag of Napa Cabs, however, start with the land. An acre of top quality Cabernet Sauvignon land can run between $300,000 – $500,000! Add in the vines, the labor, the winemaking, etc., and you can see how the price is reflected once it gets down to the bottle.

Napa Valley is small in size but big in quality and diversity. It only supplies 4% of California wine, and 4/10 of 1% of the world’s wine. 45,000 acres of Napa Valley are under vine. In comparison, 90,000 acres of Bordeaux are under vine. Napa is 1/8 the size of Bordeaux!

Although the area of Napa is small, the climate and elevation varies a great deal in just a short distance. Although it is a Mediterranean climate with dry summers and wet winters, it varies greatly from north to south and from valley to mountain top. The temperature variation is vast, and there is a great marine fog and inversion, as well. The valley floor experiences an incredible diurnal shift, which results in broader style wines that still have great acidity because of the cool nighttime temperatures. The soils can vary greatly, as well, because there are hillside stream soils, which are thin, stony, and not too weathered, there are alluvial fans, which are shallow, more drained, and of single geological origin, and then there are fluvial soils, which are found near the river and the base of Napa Valley. They are more clay heavy, deeper, and of mixed geological origin.

The strengths of Napa Valley include a Mediterranean climate, complex soils, grape growing and brand history, proximity to San Fransisco, food and tourism culture, international recognition, and great wines! Disadvantages of Napa Valley wines are the costs, including the land, labor, farming, fruit, and the finished wine. There is also a reputation in Napa of sommeliers vs. critic scores. And of course, there is the wine vs. the wine lifestyle.

After quite a bit of very interesting lecture about Napa Valley, it was time to taste 18 wines.

Flight number 1- The Whites

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Flight 1
2012 Schramsberg “Blancs des Blancs” 100% Chardonnay SRP: $38
– this was a sparkling wine that showed a nice tart apple and was relatively high in acidity. Nice and crisp!

2013 Massican “Annia” (Napa Valley AVA) 44% Friulano, 36% Ribolla Gialla, 20% Chardonnay SRP: $28
– this wine was aged on the lees, saw no malolactic.

2013 Farella Sauvignon Blanc (Coombsvilla AVA) 100% Sauvignon Blanc SRP: $20
– guava juice, sulpher, I got heavy notes of onion on this. I was not a fan! This did see some oak.

2012 Lail “Georgia” Sauvignon Blanc (Totem Vineyard, Yountville/Napa Valley AVA) 100% Sauvignon Blanc SRP: $120
– herbaceous, high acid, this I liked MUCH better than the first SB. (Considering the price, now I see why! LOL)

Flight 2 – Chardonnay
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Now this was a very cool flight to taste because they were all Chadonnays, so we could really see the differences in each vineyard.

2012 White Rock Chardonnay (Napa Valley AVA) 100% Chardonnay SRP: $34
– dry, tart green apples, high acid, old oak, lemon and pear. This is a great produced of classic style Chardonnay.

2004 Stony Hill Cardonnay (Spring Mountain District AVA) 100% Chardonnay, Wente Clones SRP: $42 (current vintage)
– dry, nutty on the palate, almond, sour apple/pear, high acid, old oak. They look toward Chablis as a model for their winemaking. They’ve been making wine since the 1950s. Almost entirely white wines (they also grow Riesling). Not much use of malolactic.

2007 Mayacamas Chardonnay (Mt. Veeder AVA) 100% Chardonnay, Shot Wente SRP: $80
– Founded as Fisher & Sons winery in 1890, became a ghost winery during prohibition. Mayacamas reds are known for being huge reds and aging for 30 years. This is a riper style vintage than the 2004 Stony Hill we just tasted. It was fermented in concrete, then moved to uprights for 6 months, then moved to barrels for malolactic fermentation.

2011 Kongsgaard Chardonnay (Carneros, Hudson and Hyde Vineyards/Napa Valley AVA) 100% Chardonnay, Wente Clones SRP: $110ish
– strong vanilla, butterscotch, high acid, lots of new oak. Carneros fruit from (Lee) Hudson and (Larry) Hyde Vineyards. John Kongsgaard known for the death and resurrection of the wine: press, ferment, all brown juice for like a year. Then he clarifies the wine and brings it back to life (sulfur). He is known for going to the grape growers and telling THEM how he wanted them to grow the grapes, not the other way around.

Flight 3 The Reds

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2013 Frog’s Leap Zinfandel (Napa Valley AVA – St. Helena & Rutherford) 77% Zinfandel, 22% Petite Syrah, 1% Carignan SRP: $30
– very dry, high acid, high tannins, cherry, plum, spice, black pepper. 20% new American oak. Frog’s Leap produces really good wine at really big production. Fresh and exuberant, this comes from fluvial soil.

2012 Storybook Mountain “Eastern Exposures” Zinfandel (Napa Valley AVA) SRP: $55
– jammy, blackberry, raspberry, big, bold, everything a Zinfandel should be. High tannins, high acid, dry, nicely balanced. 20% new American oak. This is my kind of Zin!

2012 Lagier-Meredith Syrah (Mt. Veeder AVA) 100% Syrah SRP: $48
– black fruit, earth, minerality, bone dry. High in pH. Blue and black fruits, smokey, savory tones. Peppery, green olive.

2010 Matthiasson Red (Napa Valley AVA) 55% Merlot, 35% Cabernet Sauvignon, 6% Cabernet Franc, 2% Malbec, 2% Petit Verdot SRP: $90
– Oak Knoll fruit (Dry Creeks alluvial fan), green peppers, herbaceous, coffee. Dry. Steve Matthiasson co-wrote the Lodi Green rules.

Flight 4 – The Cabs

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2011 Corison “Kronos” Cabernet Sauvignon (St. Helena AVA) 100% Cabernet Sauvignon SRP: $150
– black pepper, red fruits, black fruits, cedar. This is a traditional Napa Cab. This vineyard was planted in 1971 as Petite Sirah, then was grafted into Cab Sauv. This vineyard is still very old school as far as beig a widely spaced vineyard.

2011 Spottswoode “Estate” Cabernet Sauvignon (St. Helena AVA) 89% Cabernet Sauvignon, 8% Cabernet Franc, 3% Petit Verdot SRP: $150
– red bell pepper, deep blue, black fruit, very dry, high acid and tannins. A pitch perfect classic Napa Valley Cab.

2011 Realm “Farella” Cabernet Sauvignon (Coombsville AVA) 100% Cabernet Sauvignon SRP: $150
– bone dry, high acid and tannins. This is the iconic cult style of Cabs.

2008 Diamond Creek “Volcanic Hill” Cabernet Sauvignon (Diamond Mountain AVA) Mixed planting, predominantly CS SRP: $175
– First winery in Napa to label Cab as a grape on the label. Has a minerality to it. Austere tannin on the finish. Great representation of a mountain Cab.

2001 Robert Mondavi “Reserve” Cabernet Sauvignon (Oakville AVA) 88% Cabernet Sauvignon, 10% Cabernet Franc, 1% Malbec, 1% Petit Verdot SRP: $125 (01 price)
– dry, still tannic even though it is a 2001, oak is still present. Still has decades of aging. Robert Mondavi’s first vintage was in 1966.

1997 Heitz “Martha’s Vineyard” Cabernet Sauvignon (Oakville AVA) 100% Cabernet Sauvignon SRP: N/A
– eucalyptol (has a string of eucalyptus trees next to vinyard) = airborne terroir. This vintage is at the end of its life. First vintage was 1966.

I’ve got to tell you, 18 wines in a couple of hours… wow. My senses were pretty much shot after that. That was a LOT of aroma smelling! I had a Traveling Vineyard tasting to conduct that night, and on my way to my hostess’s house, all I could smell was a strong vanilla aroma from new American oak! LOL It was embedded in my nose and brain! Fortunately I’ve become a master at tasting, swishing, and spitting the wine, so I’m no longer ingesting the wines and getting buzzed. Of course when I go back and look at the prices of some of these wines, it makes me sad that they haven’t been fully enjoyed and just spit out! At least I know they’ve gone to a good cause… the learning of and appreciation for the beauty of wine.

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So my knowledge quest continues and my continuous studying for the next level of my CMS goes on. Meanwhile, my Traveling Vineyard business has been going wonderfully. My team continues to grow (I have 9 wonderful wine babies now) and I am on the brink of earning my incentive trip to Cabo! Our New England regional meeting is this Sunday, which is going to be super exciting, so I will be sure to write a blog about all that fun and excitement! Drop me a line sometime or come chat with me on my Facebook page at facebook.com/winedowntastings!

Cheers!
Missa
http://www.winedowntastings.com
winedowntastings@gmail.com