International Albariño Day

Today, August 1, 2019 is International Albariño Day! This Spanish grape variety (Alvarinho in Portugal) is vibrant and refreshing. It is loved for its crisp acidity, distinct aromatics, bright citrus notes, and subtle salinity. This is the perfect wine for these hot August days.

Typically vinified in a dry style, Albariño offers vibrant, fresh citrus fruit flavors of lemon, lime, and grapefruit, tree fruits such as pear and apple, and stone fruits such as peach and nectarine. Generally not a wine intended to be aged for a long period of time, Albariño is best consumed relatively young. Spain produces a significant amount of Albarino in Rias Baixas DO, as does the Vinho Verde region of Portugal.

Albarino, Albarinho, Vinho Verde, Rias Baixas

Albariño’s high acid content and subtle phenolics make it a perfect food wine. Its aromatics allow it to perfectly pair with ethnic cuisine such as Indian, Thai, Vietnamese, and other Asian cuisine. Seafood is a natural pairing to highlight the slight saline quality. Think shellfish such as oysters, mussels, clams, lobster and crab as well as white flaky fish and a variety of sushi and maki rolls. I believe Albariño to be a very underrated variety here in the US, however that allows you to enjoy a beautiful high quality wine at an inexpensive price point. Click here for some delicious suggestions available to ship directly to your door from VINOvations.


Perfect Pairing Recipes

Galician Mussels in White Wine from CuriousCuisiniere.com
https://www.curiouscuisiniere.com/mussels-in-white-wine/


Click here for more info on Albarino Day from TapasSociety.org


Cheers!
Missa
winedowntastings.com
vinoislife.com

Summer With Sangria

Written for and published in the July 2019 issue of South Shore Senior News

What mixed beverage screams summertime louder than Sangria? Sangrias are a staple at BBQs, cookouts, picnics, pool parties, and even beachside. Not only are they fruity, delicious, refreshing, and a crowd favorite, but they are incredibly simple to make. In fact, there are very few hard and fast rules when it comes to concocting a sangria recipe. A bottle of your favorite wine and pretty much anything else, mixed with some fruit: boom, sangria.

Traditionally, this Spanish drink starts with Rioja, a Spanish red wine based on the Tempranillo grape, mixed with various fruits, and sweetened with sugar and orange juice. Nowadays, it is common to make sangria with any style wine you wish, whether red, white, rose, dry, sweet, or even sparkling. The additions are also a free-for-all: your favorite fruit juice, other spirits such as brandy or vodka (flavored or plain), seltzers or sodas, and of course a variety of fruit. Served cold on ice, this refreshing drink can transform anyone into a mixologist for the day.

When I make sangria, vodka is my spirit of choice. There are so many delicious flavored vodkas on the market, and mixing them creates some unique and exciting flavors. I like to soak my fruit in the spirits for a few hours, if not overnight, before mixing the rest of the ingredients, but that is certainly your choice. Below are three of my favorite, simple sangria recipes you can enjoy this summer.

Red Wine Sangria
* 2 bottles of Spanish red wine
* ¾ cup raspberry vodka
* ¾ cup pomegranate vodka
* Sprite Zero (1 – 2 cans to taste)
* Sliced/chopped fruits: orange slices, strawberries, blueberries

Blend both vodkas in a pitcher and add sliced/chopped fruit and berries, allowing to soak in the refrigerator for 2-12 hours. Once fruit has soaked, add in the wine and chill until ready to serve. Immediately upon serving, add in your preferred amount of Sprite Zero or other carbonated citrus based beverage of your choice. Serve over ice.

White Wine Sangria
* 2 bottles white wine
* 2/3 cup of orange flavored liquor (Grand Marnier, Cointreau)
* Fruit: peeled mango slices, orange slices, sliced strawberries, raspberries

Add all ingredients into a pitcher and refrigerate for a few hours. Stir prior to serving and pour over ice. Optionally, top with a mint leaf for garnish.

Based upon White Sangria with Mangoes and Berries

Pink Sangria
* 2 bottle of rose’ wine
* 1 liter ginger ale
* 2 cups pineapple juice
* 1 can frozen lemonade concentrate, thawed
* 2 (10 ounce) packages of frozen strawberries, thawed

Stir the strawberries, lemonade concentrate, rose wine, and pineapple juice in a punch bowl or large pitcher until combined. Stir in the ginger ale just before serving. Based upon Pretty In Pink Sangria

The fun in making sangria is in the experimentation. Try different wines, different spirits, juices, sodas, and fruits and have a blast creating your own signature recipes!

Cheers!
Missa
winedowntastings.com

Wine & Your Backyard BBQ

As we wrap up June and head into July, we are fully immersed in BBQ season. Offer your guests an explosion of flavor by enhancing your foods with the perfect condiment, wine!

Smoked Meats

Red wines that show significant oak, spice, or smoke lead me to immediately think smoked meat, for obvious reasons! The oak and/or spice of many Syrahs, for instance, will enhance the smokey flavor of the meats beautifully, as will its fruit forwardness. My pick is DeLoach Private Collection Russian River Valley Syrah.

Grilled Red Meat

Many California Red Blends such as Full Rack and The Prospector are crafted to be quintessential backyard BBQ blends. Both of these particular blends combine some notorious big reds that will make grilled red meat like burgers and steaks shine!

Grilling adds a bitter charred taste to foods, and the fruit forwardness of Full Rack and The Prospector will contrast that bitterness.

BBQ Sauce

When I consider foods with BBQ sauce, my mouth waters when I picture a big jammy, juicy Zinfandel in my glass. Pulled pork or pulled chicken, BBQ ribs, burgers smothered in BBQ sauce.

The blackberry, raspberry, and plum notes of Zinfandel will compliment the tangy and often sweeter flavors of the BBQ sauce, and whether lightly or heavily oaked will enhance a smoky flavor. My current pick, Saints and Zinners Zinfandel from Paso Robles.

Seafood

Summer seafood is often dipped or drenched in melted butter, and nothing pairs better with buttered seafood than a nice Chardonnay! Whether you prefer the vanilla notes and creamy, buttery texture of an oaked Chard, or you prefer the crispness of an unoaked Chardonnay, you will find a home run with either wine at your clam bake or crawfish boil. Francis Ford Coppola’s Cafe Zoetrope Chardonnay is simply divine.

Antipasto Salad

“If it grows together, it goes together!” When serving Italian meats, cheeses, and olives, think Italian wine, either red OR white! The fat and salt components of the meats, cheeses, and olives in antipasto salad will smooth out the acid in any white, allowing the wine’s fruit to come to the forefront while still offering a crisp zestiness. I suggest Il Poeta Gavi from Piemonte or Saracosa Vermentino from Toscana IGT.

If you prefer a heavier wine and deeper fruit flavor, you will find Italian reds such as Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, Chianti Classico (such as Lornano Le Macchie Chianti Classico), Nero d’Avola, or Barbera (such as Casa Taurini Barbera d’Asti Superiore) to be magical with this dish!

Pasta and Potato Salads

Pasta and potato salads, whether dressed with a vinaigrette or light mayonnaise, pair deliciously with crisp, fruity white wines, such as Zapapico Torrontes from Argentina or Sonnenstrahl Gruner Veltliner from Austria. Matching the medium bodied weight of the wines with the medium weight of the salad will ensure one doesn’t overpower the other’s flavors.

Green Salads

Pinot Grigio (such as Paolo Valle Pinot Grigio from Colli Orientali del Friuli DOP) and Sauvignon Blanc (such as the Chilean Riversong Sauvignon Blanc) are particularly pleasing with lemon drizzle. Pairing a green salad with a lemon vinaigrette would be refreshing to the palate while enhancing the flavors of a variety of crisp vegetables.

S’mores

What’s a backyard BBQ without s’mores? You can really pair these with a variety of wines. Bigger, bold reds such as A Tavola Cabernet Sauvignon, or lighter, fruitier reds such as The Arch Pinot Noir, and even sweet and fruity if you choose.

Cheers!
Missa
winedowntastings.com

Pairing the New England Clambake

As a lifetime New Englander, I basically grew up on everything you’d find at a traditional clam bake: a variety of steamed quahogs and littlenecks, mussels, boiled lobster, crab legs, corn on the cob drenched in melted butter, boiled red potatoes, clam chowder, potato, macaroni, and green salads… the list goes on and on. To me, this is the epitome of summertime dining in New England. Little did I know as a child, this culinary tradition would only get better once I was an adult and had a knowledge of wine to add even more enjoyment.

Let’s Talk Wine Pairing

Clams (quahogs, littlenecks, cherrystones) and mussels are absolutely delicious steamed and dipped in melted butter. Often times I’ll grab an oaked, buttery Chardonnay (such as DeLoach Private Collection Chalk Hill) for that melt-in-your-mouth experience, or I’ll grab a zesty and lively Sauvignon Blanc (such as Riversong Sauvignon Blanc), with a bit more crispness and acidity than a Chard. It’s really a matter of my particular mood and preference that day, but either one provides a home run pairing that is sure to please.

I recently posted an entire blog for Lobster Day, highlighting various lobster dishes and my favorite varietals. There are so many delicious choices for perfect pairing, although my absolute favorite is a dry sparkling wine, particularly Cremant de Loire (such as Abbesse Cremant de Loire), which provides the perfect note of salinity to compliment shellfish.

King crab legs are one of my faves, although a bit interactive. When I don’t mind getting my hands dirty and working for my food, I grab my nut and seafood cracker and get to crackin’ those spiny bad boys. Next to my plate of crab legs and pool of melted butter is a perfectly chilled glass of dry Riesling from Alsace, France, or a fruit forward, fuller bodied Pinot Gris (such as Hillersden Pinot Gris from Marlborough, New Zealand).

Clam chowder all year long… comfort food in the winter, beachy goodness in the summer. My suggested wine pairing is equally as versatile. Two of my favorites, Bees Knees Chenin Blanc/Viognier and Lobster Shack Chardonnay/Viognier, both from South Africa offer a beautiful balance of refreshing fruit and lively acidity with a weightier mouthfeel appropriate for both summertime and wintertime dining.

The Sides

Corn-on-the-cob, boiled potatoes, salads of all sorts. Every wine mentioned above would pair beautifully with all of these sides. Have fun with the experimenting! No clam bake would be complete without a rosé , and I am absolutely digging Paris Street Rose from Romania. A few more notable suggested wines would include The Arch Pinot Noir, for all you die hard red wine lovers, and Sonnenstrahl Grüner Veltliner from Austria. Happy pairing!

Join Our Clambake and Wine Pairing

None of the work, all of the fun! Enjoy the cuisine of Chef J. Rex poolside at Lantera Boston Landing on Wednesday, July 31st at 6:30pm as I guide you through the perfect wine pairings with each course!
Click here for tickets and more information or find our event on Facebook

Cheers!
Missa
winedowntastings.com

Summer Grillin’ and Sippin’

It’s grill season! Summertime wine pairings are some of my absolute favorites, but it’s not all about the protein. The spices and sauces are the stars of my wine pairing show. I have chosen five popular grilling spices to highlight for your summertime grilling needs.

Jamaican Jerk: the heat of Jamaican Jerk spices beg for a touch of sweetness in a wine, such as an off dry Riesling, Chenin Blanc, or even a Moscatel.

Bacon Molasses: Bacon Molasses spice rubs and sauces are a tasteful twist on traditional barbecue flavors. The smoky yet salty qualities of the bacon combined with the subtle sweetness of molasses makes this a fabulous pairing for a variety of wines, such as Pinotage and Spanish red blends.

Mesquite: Mesquite gives your meat a lovely smoky flavor, and a tried and true pairing is “smoke with oak”. A fruity, jammy Zinfandel has the perfect balance of oak and jammy red fruit that is sure to please the palate when paired with grilled Mesquite flavors.

Kansas City BBQ: Many California red blends  are crafted with BBQ in mind, and Kansas City BBQ sauce provides the ideal combination of tang, sweetness, smoke, and acidity to express exactly what these blends were meant for.

Chipotle: Both a softly oaked Chardonnay and a crisp, refreshing unoaked Chardonnay will compliment the zesty spice of chipotle. Prefer a red? Opt for a juicy red wine with softer tannins, such as Merlot.  

Wine and grilling spices

Visit us at vinovations.us for the perfect wine selections shipped right to your door!

Cheers!
Missa
winedowntastings.com

Cheers To Lobster Day!

Celebrate Twice A Year

According to DaysOfTheYear.com, June 15, 2019 is Lobster Day. According to NationalToday.com, September 25, 2019 is National Lobster Day. I have zero objections to celebrating lobster on more than one day a year, that’s for sure! Being a lifetime New Englander, Maine lobster has been a staple in my diet for as long as I can remember, and pairing various lobster dishes with wine makes it that much more enjoyable.

The Ol’ Standby

When in doubt, you truly can’t go wrong pairing any type of lobster dish with a buttery and somewhat oaky Chardonnay, especially if you’re fond of dipping your lobster meat in melted butter. For obvious reasons, it really is a match made in heaven. In fact, a hot buttered lobster roll was the first food I ever paired with Chardonnay many moons ago. It literally changed my life.

I am also quite fond of creamy, savory lobster mac and cheese dishes with a full bodied, buttery, and mildly oaked Chardonnay. A true no-brainer pairing that you don’t even need to put effort into considering that is sure to please the palate. However, why not have some fun and go outside the box a bit?

Lobster Rolls

Here in New England, one of the first signs of summer is when the local restaurants start adding lobster rolls to their menu. Of course lobster rolls can be made in a variety of ways, and I enjoy pairing each style of lobster roll with a different varietal.

Traditional Maine lobster roll with light mayo, chopped celery or chives, and perhaps a drizzle of lemon on a buttered roll: I enjoy this style lobster roll with a wine that offers bright acidity and crisp fruit flavors such as a Chablis. Leaving the Chardonnay grape behind, I absolutely love pairing these rolls with a crisp, refreshing, dry Riesling from Alsace.

The hot buttered lobster roll, what a treat these are! How can this incredible treat get even better? Pair it with a Fume’ Blanc or white Bordeaux.

Lobster with fresh tarragon and a touch of lemon: Rueda Verdejo from Spain, hands down. The combinations of ripe citrus, stone and tree fruit, herbaceous grassiness, and crisp acidity of Rueda Verdejo not only supports but makes the flavors of both the lobster and tarragon shine.

Lobster Salads

Crisp medium to high acid whites with a degree of aromatics are perfection with lobster salads, such as Gruner Veltliner, Torrontes, Albarino, and Viognier. I also particularly enjoy a dry rosé from Provence.

Lobster Mac and Cheese

This is actually one of my favorite dishes in the fall and winter. No need to wait for warm sunny days to enjoy this comfort food that’s been stepped up a notch. Match the weight of your wine to the weight of this dish, meaning choose either a full bodied white or a medium bodied red. I find a dry Vouvray to be absolutely delightful, as well as a fuller bodied Pinot Gris from Oregon. If I’m in a red wine kid of mood, I’m reaching for a red Burgundy or Oregon Pinot Noir, or even a Grenache.

Lobster/Seafood Paella

I love to match my food with its country of origin, so when I’m enjoying lobster or seafood paella, I’m reaching for a wine from Spain, particularly a Ribera del Duero or Priorat for reds, and Rias Baixas for white.


Whichever way you decide to enjoy your lobster, if you can’t make a wine pairing decision, do what I do and go bubbly. I’ve never been disappointed with lobster and bubbly!

Cheers!
Missa
winedowntastings.com

Rosé All Day!

Published in June 2019 issue of South Shore Senior News

National Rosé Day is celebrated every year on the second Saturday in June. When many Americans think of rosé, their first thought is the sweeter styled White Zinfandel, which was discovered by Bob Trinchero with Sutter Home in 1972, quite by accident while experimenting with the Zinfandel grape. Visitors of the tasting room found a fondness for the resulting “accidental” wine, and the masses demanded more production. He ramped up production in 1975 when for reasons unknown, the fermentation stopped at around 2% residual sugar, leaving a noticeable sweetness. People loved the resulting product, and white Zinfandel became extremely popular over the following decades.

The one perhaps unfortunate result of the rise of white Zinfandel and its style is that Americans tend to assume that all rosé or pink wines are sweet, and that couldn’t be further from the truth. Dry rosés are the norm all over the world, including France, Italy, and Spain. Someone who doesn’t particularly enjoy a sweeter style rosé wine such as white Zinfandel might very likely find much enjoyment in the drier styles that are available.

There are many factors that influence a rosé, including grape variety, region and terroir in which the grapes are grown, winemaking styles, techniques, and traditions, and of course market demands. For instance, the rosés of Provence are typically made by the direct press method, which includes gently pressing the grapes and collecting the juice after it has only had about 1-4 hours macerating on the skins, resulting in a very pale colored, light and fresh style of rosé. In many other regions of France such as Tavel, however, it is more popular to use the saignée method of production, which allows the juice to macerate for a 8-24 hours, then is bled off the skins to be fermented into rosé. This results in a deeper color, fuller in body, and more aromatic than the direct press method.

Rosé wines, both still and sparkling, have been considered a trend on the rise for the past several years in the US. In 2017, rosé sales increased by 53% with no slowing down in sight. Considered a refreshing, summertime wine, rosés appeal to white and red wine lovers alike, providing the red fruit notes of a red combined with the refreshing crispness of a white. It offers the best of both worlds!

When it comes to food pairing, dry rosés pair quite well with lighter or medium weight foods and summer fare, such as salads, seafood, grilled chicken, grilled vegetables, and an array of salty cheese and snacks. Adding fresh red berries and fruit really brings its fruit flavors to the forefront. Think fresh strawberries in your salad. Or make a nice charcuterie board containing an array of meats, cheeses, crackers, nuts, and berries for a variety of textures and flavors. Rosé is typically served mildly chilled and makes for a refreshing sipper during the warmer summer months.

Enjoy some of my favorite hand-picked salad recipes with the dry rose’ of your choice for the ultimate summertime meal.

Cheers!
Missa
winedowntastings.com

National Cheese Day

June 4th is National Cheese Day! Cheese boards are a staple of my home entertaining. There is nothing simpler, yet delicious and enthusiastically received by my guests than a variety of cheeses to pair with whichever wines we will be sipping on. Cheese boards can be inexpensive with easy to find, traditional cheeses most Americans are familiar with, or they can be an eclectic spread of costly gourmet cheeses from all over the world. I often enjoy having one or two gourmet cheeses that are new or unique to my crowd of guests, accompanied by several common “ol’ standby” cheeses to offer a little something for everyone. In honor of National Cheese Day, I offer you seven simple, easy to find cheeses and my favorite varietals to pair with them perfectly.

  • Herbed goat cheese with Sauvignon Blanc
  • Delice de Bourgogne with Chardonnay
  • Gruyere with Gewurztraminer
  • Feta or Gorgonzola with dry rosé
  • Buffalo mozzarella with Sangiovese
  • Smoked Gouda with Syrah/Shriaz
  • Horseradish cheddar with Cabernet Sauvignon

Want to learn more? Join us at one of our VINOIsLife public wine and cheese pairing experiences in the greater Boston/MetroWest areas! Click here for our experience schedule.

Cheers!
Missa
winedowntastings.com

Sips and Dips!

These days, life is all about experiences. The gathering of friends, creating of memories, and sharing in experiences. Wine creates more memories than any other beverage in the world, but the old school thinking of wine being pretentious and complicated is gone. Whether in one of my public wine classes or at one of my private in-home wine and food pairing experiences, it has been proven time and time again almost anything can be paired beautifully with wine. A crowd favorite is a “Sips and Dips” theme, which is exactly what it sounds like: the perfect wine paired with a variety of dips. Easy as could be, minimal prep time, and a casual great time for everyone. I have compiled some popular dips and suggested recipes with my personal favorite wine style pairings.

Buffalo Chicken Dip

Buffalo chicken dip is my favorite go-to dip at any party or gathering because it pairs incredibly with almost any wine! It’s particularly good with off dry and semi sweet whites, but it’s also a home run with the dry whites and reds, as well. My personal favorite is an off-dry Riesling or Chenin Blanc, but have fun with this one! When in doubt, grab whatever bottle of wine you have and serve up a bowl of buffalo dip, and let the fun begin.

Frank’s Red Hot Buffalo Chicken Dip Recipe


Meat Lover’s Pizza Dip

This dip is so easy to make and incredibly delicious. Best of all, it’s low carb and keto friendly! The ol’ “If it grows together, it goes together” applies here, so it’s wonderful with any Italian red, however the salt, fat, and acidity of the dip makes this a fabulous partner to a majority of medium and full bodied red wines. My favorites include Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, Sangiovese, and Nero d’Avola.

KeepRecipes.com Meat Lover’s Pizza Dip Recipe


Crab Rangoon Dip

Crab rangoons are another favorite staple wine pairing with any white or rose wine, so it makes sense to ditch the wonton wrappers and grab a spoon! I enjoy this dip with a crisp Pinot Grigio from the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region of Italy, as well as a fruit forward yet refreshing dry rose’ from Provence, France, but in reality, most dry and off-dry whites will be delightful with this dip.

Spend With Pennies Crab Rangoon Dip Recipe


Jalapeno Popper Dip

Sweet loves heat, and that’s certainly the case with off dry and semi sweet white wines when paired with this incredible jalapeno dip. All of the deliciousness of stuffed jalapenos with the ease of a dip. Dry whites work beautifully as well, as will a dry rose’.

Taste of Home Jalapeno Popper Dip Recipe


Spinach Artichoke Dip

This is a standard go-to favorite. With its creamy texture and salty flavors, spinach artichoke dip will pair beautifully with a variety of wines. My personal favorite is Sauvignon Blanc. Combined, this varietal with this dip highlights the herbaceousness of both the dip and the wine, offering beautiful “green” flavors.

Spend With Pennies Spinach Artichoke Dip Recipe


Dessert Dip: Monster Cookie Dough Dip

This dip is just a good time in a bowl! Between the peanut butter, oats, M&Ms, and cream cheese, it’s everything delectable all mixed up in one bowl. Perfect sweet treat for a buttery chardonnay, semi sweet whites, and even some fruit forward reds, such as Pinot Noir, Grenache, or Gamay!

SomethingSwanky.com Monster Cookie Dough Dip Recipe


Cheers!
Missa
winedowntastings.com

Celebrating Oregon Wine Month

Originally published in the May 2019 issue of the South Shore Senior News

There are countless numbers of world wine regions I am incredibly fond of for a variety of reasons, but Oregon is one of my very favorites. If you have yet to enjoy a wine from Oregon, you are in for a wonderful surprise. This region produces some of the purest, highest quality wines in the world with a large focus on sustainability. Oregon boasts more than 700 wineries and more than 1,000 vineyards growing 72 grape varieties.

Pinot Noir is the predominantly grown grape in Oregon, making up 72% of the region’s grapes, with Pinot Gris a distant second, comprising 14% of the region’s grapes. Chardonnay, Riesling, Syrah, and Cabernet Sauvignon are also grown and produced here, among many others, and offer superior domestic wines to the US market.

Oregon wines are often discussed as being similar in style and even quality to the wines of Burgundy, France. Both Oregon and Burgundy produce wines that distinctly reflect the individual terroir in which the grapes were grown. You can actually taste the difference in terroir (soil type, slope gradient, slope aspect and sunshine hours, climate, etc.) from vineyard to vineyard, even if only a mile or less away. Although I would never consider Oregon in the shadow of Burgundy, I do believe Burgundy has been a source of inspiration to its Oregon counterparts for many decades.

Oregon’s winemakers focus on small batch, high-quality wines. The grape growers and winemakers take incredible pride in their craft, and that is represented well with consistently high ratings by Wine Spectator and the like. In fact, Oregon wines made up 20% of Wine Spectator’s 90+ scores on domestic wines in 2017.

There is a culture of sustainability among Oregon farmers and winemakers, something more and more of us are prioritizing when it comes to the preservation of our planet. 47% of Oregon’s vineyards are certified sustainable, a higher percentage than any other domestic wine region. Oregon also accounts for 35% of US Demeter Biodynamic vineyards. Matt Kramer of Wine Spectator remarks, “It’s here in the culture; it’s here in the air. The very DNA or Oregon winegrowing is sympathetic to this non-interventionist, naturalist, small-scale form of farming and winemaking.”

With incredible respect and admiration for sustainability and biodynamic farming, I will more often than not choose a wine from Oregon over any other if it is available on a menu while I am dining out. I know I am getting a wine that a community’s heart and soul went into growing and making, and that spirit is reflected in each savored sip.

Since 2012, the Oregon wine industry has celebrated Oregon Wine Month annually in May. I invite you join in and celebrate with your own bottle of wine from Oregon, and discover a new favorite wine region to enjoy for a lifetime.

For more information, visit https://www.oregonwine.org/

SSSNMay2019